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that will happen. >>> still ahead, we're joined by actor and director ben affleck and the emmy-winning star of "veep," julia louis-dreyfus. first, caroline kennedy with her new book on her father's presidency. we'll hear audio from jfk himself inside the oval office. irping ]hon [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive safe. k. love you. [ chirping, buzzing continues ] [ horn honks ] [ buzzing continues ] [ male announcer ] the sprint drive first app. blocks and replies to texts while you drive. we can live without the &. visit sprint.com/drive. in that time there've been some good days. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ >>> welcome back to "morning joe." you know, on the 50th anniversary of the cuban missile crisis, caroline kennedy joined us with never-before-released audio recordings from inside her father's white house. >> caroline contributed to
here, ben. it's a very challenging time for so many folks. if you look at the u.s. sense success, 49 million americans are poor. 1 out of 6 american here. does this plan help or increase the burden on people who are not doing well and particularly within the african-american community? >> you know, one of the key things here that is very important is that we extended unemployment insurance for the lo long-term unemployed. that's important because 2 million people in our country every day beating the pavement trying to find a job. in our community, in the black community, the average length of unemployment is 27 weeks. that's exactly as long as it takes to qualify as being long-term unemployed. it's a week past six months. so for the average black person, long-term unemployment insurance is critical. for our communities it's critical, because every dollar that an unemployed person receives they can spend. they spend is very closely to where they live. that was critical, and i think frankly we saw it as one of the most critical things. >> and, ben, talk a little bit about the expectati
such conversations we're having with retiring members. jonas freight sit down with ben nelson -- join us for a sit down with ben nelson. he helped forge a domination. that is 8:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. interviews with two retired house members. first jerry lewis and later, a conversation with california lynn woolsey. the epa administrator has announced her decision to resign her posts in january. the chief environmental watchdog is stepping down after a nearly four this year tenure , new controls on coal-fired plants. jackson found herself caught between administration pledges to solve controversial problems and steady resistant from groups that complaint the rules destroy jobs and make it harder for american companies to compete internationally. that is from the ap. steny hoyer will talk about the looming fiscal cliff during a briefing later today. that will be about 2:15 eastern and we'll have that life for you here on c-span. kent conrad is retiring after 26 years in office. he talked about partisanship in the senate and his time working on economic issues including his time on the bowle
interviews with retiring members of congress. at 8:00 p.m. easter, senator ben nelson of nebraska talks about his two terms and his time as a member of the gang of six. then at 8:40, represented jerry lewis of california on his 17 terms in congress. that is followed at 9:15 with representative lynn woolsey on her anti-war work. that is thursday at 8:00 p.m. eastern, here on c-span. >> tonight, a discussion on corporations in pursuit of high stock values. then a group economist explains why he believes the u.s. is responsible for the global financial crisis. later, interviews with retiring members of congress. on tomorrow morning's washington journal, we are asking business owners to call in and talk about the fiscal cliff and their plans for next year. then we will continue with the forecast for the coming years housing market. that is all about more discussion of the fiscal cliff negotiations as congress returns to washington. we will be joined by steve forbes. later, discussion on background checks, how they work, who gets them, and when they are required. our guest is matt bennett. "washin
gross excesses' remained out of sight. until some believe their own rhetoric -- read ben bernanke -- about moderation. but when the global minotaur was mortally wounded, it left the global economy in disarray. it has put the world in permanent crisis. the minotaur was slain by a brave warrior named theseus. its death ushered a new era of tragedy, history, philosophy. our very own global minotaur died as the victim of wall street bankers. what will its demise bring? should be hope for a new era in which wealth does not require poverty? will be develop a system where no longer will abstract power waned while others get stronger? the global minotaur will be remembered as a remarkable piece to whose rain created and destroyed the aleutian -- the illusion that the global economy was stable. [applause] right. questions? i think i am going to moderate myself. ok, you have to line up. this is the way you do it here, isn't it? >> that is a brilliant vision of where we have been. can you elaborate a little bit more on where you see us going? >> very briefly, i think that we are in a state o
. in 2005, our son ben had significant surgery over the summer. later in the term, he had more. he called me every day on cell phone to see how ben was doing. and that is the relationship. we are parents first. he understood what my family was going through. you can always build on that. you can always find common ground. he ended up voting on environmental legislation with mefter he told me that he was not a tree hugger and he would not do it. it does work and it is important. you have to focus on what you have in common with the people of new hampshire have in common >> growing up in everett -- have in common. >> and growing up in a republican family and you are of a different party, you realize they're wonderful people on the other side of the spectrum. we worked closely with the republicans, especially the women senators for the yard. kelly had the great race to call me after i w. we talk about the yard and our commitment to the military and to veterans. we share a lot. we need to remember that. >> back to the table of seven kids -- >> i feel i was born bipartisan. my mother was republic
of individual americans. and we all remember the wonderful comment by ben franklin -- i will paraphrase it -- but essentially ben franklin said that if you give up your liberty to have security, you really don't deserve either. and so we owe it to the hardworking men and women in the intelligence community to work closely with them to find that kind of balance that ben franklin was talking about, and we can help them do it by conducting robust oversight, roy bust oversight -- robust oversight over the work that's being done there so that members of the public can have confidence in the important work being done by the men and women in the intelligence community and confidence that, as we protect our security at a dangerous time, we are also protecting the individual liberties of our people. now, mr. president, the story with respect to this debate really begins in early america when the colonists were famously subjected to a lot of taxes by the british government. the american colonists thought thathat this was unfair because they were not represented in the british parliament, and they
and all of the other people -- and ben reeseberg and all the other people. [applause] you have been wondering what i have been doing and i have been wondering what you have been doing. [laughter] >> those who were disappointed by this outcome, the democrats elated by this outcome -- given the conventional wisdom around this campaign, the president's approval ratings that were barely above 50%, often dipping below it, the unemployment around 8%, gdp growth stock of around 2% -- the conventional wisdom was that should -- that this president should not be reelected. as you take a look at what happened two weeks ago, how do you assess this? >> let me just say first that i made a very good living and politics betting against conventional wisdom. it is a general principle of mine that the conventional wisdom is almost always wrong and it was wrong here. it was wrong here because what we often do in political circles and journalism is that we look at what happened in the last election or past elections and we think it is prescriptive for what it will happen -- for what will happen in the f
of harpercollins. [applause] ben fountain, billy lynn's long -- [inaudible] [applause] published by echo press, an imprint of harpercollins. kevin powers, the yellow bird. published by little brown. [applause] the 2012 national book award for fiction dose -- goes to "the round house", by louise erdrich. [applause] ♪ ♪ hey, baby, where are you is? [laughter] [applause] [laughter] >> wow. hello, my relatives. [speaking in native tongue] national book foundation and also the judges, and a shout out for all of the native people who are watching this live stream. [applause] i want to thank harpercollins. it's not each a huge company anymore -- can it's not even a huge company anymore. [laughter] but it's always been about four or five people to me. people who believed so strongly in my work that they've supported me and my family and literature. my bookstore and all of us who work there through these years. i want to thank my editor, terry cardin, for believing in the book. [applause] jonathan burnham, jane byrne, jim duffy, i want to thank andrew wily and jim ott. [applause] i want to sa
are a fierce believer in independence of thought, and dissent, and not even george washington or ben franklin might've had a complete monopoly on all of this so it was usual that you had at george mason critiquing it. >> i think george mason seems like a pretty stubborn guy. the other thing was that you know, i think that he made it clear, he did not undermine the process. if you go back and look at the last days, george mason did not throw a monkey wrench into the works. what he did was he made it clear. he made it absolutely clear, he had his list of objections. he thought you needed a bill of rights. he was not a politician. he had -- he was not into making a lot of friends and allies. he was going to argue his point and then he was going to return. i happen to think that was pretty effective. he wasn't against it. remember he was very helpful in developing the constitution, with a strong national government. but, he wanted to build this wall that would make it clear that did not exist in sort of contradiction or in opposition to these individual rights. again, he wasn't cynical. he wasn't
comprise the seven republicans and seven democrats to spearhead with john warner, john mccain, and ben nelson. it was born to avert an institutional crisis as a result of repeated, systematic filibustering of president bush's judicial nominees in the senate. in response, the republican majority were going to exercise the nuclear option and it would have jettisoned longstanding rules requiring 60 votes to end a filibuster. the 60-vote threshold has always been protecting the rights of the minority, but when it becomes just a simple majority vote? how that happened? it would have had enormous implications for the future of the senate. just as we were about to cross the political rubicon, the gang of 14 forced a pact based on mutual trust that we would only support a filibuster under what we labeled as extraordinary circumstances and we would oppose the nuclear option. it embodies the very manifestation of the power of sense is building. as this body contemplates changes to its rules in the next congress, i would urge all my colleagues who are returning to follow the gang of 14 and exerci
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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